US Visual and Performing Arts

The Visual Arts program promotes the development of aesthetic and perceptual skills appropriate to students at each level. Students in grades nine through twelve choose from a wide variety of specialized studio classes such as drawing, painting, photography, sculpture and ceramics. The basic curriculum of each class includes the history of the discipline, creative use of materials and pertinent vocabulary. Students are encouraged to take risks as they seek original, interpretive responses to complex assignments.

The Performing Arts program includes courses and activities in both music and theater. While most of the theater performance opportunities at Pace are co-curricular, the music department offers performance experiences within the academic schedule as well as outside the classroom.

Fundamentals of Acting

The purpose of this course is to learn the fundamental skills and terminology necessary to comprehend and apply basic acting techniques. Students will develop an appreciation for the artistry of acting through practical experience, theatrical exercises, class discussions, assignments and journals.

Advanced Acting

The purpose of this course is to further develop and solidify the skills learned in the Fundamentals of Acting class. Students work through challenging theatrical exercises, scene work and audition techniques. Students are encouraged to perform in after-school drama productions as well as in competition. This course is for the dedicated acting student who demonstrates creativity, commitment and passion for the theatre.

Advanced Studio Art

This course is offered to the serious, mature twelfth-grade art student nominated by the Visual Arts Faculty. Students are required to assume the many responsibilities of working independently. Self-motivation is an important criterion for this course. Drawing and painting are the basis for the first semester, with students drawing from a model, using imagination and studying advanced topics in color, light and shadow. In the second semester, students work on their concentration, building a large body of work. This concentration, with written and creative components, will be exhibited in the spring at the Senior Advanced Studio Exhibition.

AP Art History

This yearlong course provides the senior student with an overview of painting, sculpture and architecture which reflects the interests, anxieties and concerns of people throughout the world and throughout the centuries. Although the focus is on Western art, we will also study the non-European world including Indian, Chinese, Japanese, African, Native-American and Pre-Columbian cultures. The student will develop a very specific vocabulary that is in constant use for written and spoken analyses of the aesthetic and technical aspects of works

AP Music Theory

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the practice and theory of Western music as is defined in the music from the late 17th century to the present. The course will focus on understanding all elements of pitch; the elements of rhythm; triads and seventh chords with their inversions; diatonic chords in major and minor keys; basic principles of voice leading; harmonic progression; cadences and phrases; non-chord tones; dominant seven-chord functions; and secondary functions. The course culminates with the AP examination and an original composition by the student.

Band

Band is a daily class that combines the talents of its members to rehearse and perform concerts throughout the year. Concepts to be developed are: proper articulation of musical passages; good breathing techniques and placement; effective dynamics with regard to both melodic shape and overall interpretation; and clear understanding of simple and compound meters.

Ceramics I

This course provides the student with an understanding of the elements and principles of design as they relate to the aesthetic and technical concerns of ceramics. All forms of ceramic techniques such as pinch pots, slab building, coiling, wheel work, glazing and firing of electric and raku kilns will be explored.

Ceramics II & III

These courses expand on concepts and techniques covered in Ceramics I with a review of previous methods of construction and a development of more complex forms. Students will continue their study of ceramics of different cultures. Emphasis will be placed on combining influences from previous cultures while developing a more personal style.

Chorus

Chorus is a choral experience that presents musical literature in diverse styles (classical, jazz, musical theater, pop) by significant composers. Work in this course allows for the enhancement of the voice: its projection, tuning and richness. The course will also increase students’ musical skills: self-confidence in part reading, application of interpretive markings and accuracy in language pronunciation. Students perform in concerts on campus and on tour.

Design Concepts

Digital Illustration I & II

These courses will investigate the role of technology as a form of artistic expression. We will begin with the history and evolution of graphic art and with the creation of a final project merging technology and art. Students will learn how to cut and paste from existing images and create original images while building their artistic vocabulary and comprehension. Students will also be introduced to some practical knowledge about the computer: how it works and how to keep it working. Students will be assessed by projects involving the manipulation of graphics software, scanners, the Internet, digital cameras and comprehension of some basic technological knowledge. Grades will consist of various assessments of related topics with the final product demonstrating proficiency with the above-mentioned equipment. The software programs that will be used are Photoshop, Fireworks and Dreamweaver. These applications are used by professional graphic artists for different types of print and web media.

Drawing I & II

Students are introduced to materials, techniques and compositional structure, such as design principles and elements. Students are encouraged to develop a personal style, while learning to observe acutely. Critical thinking and analysis are taught, as students learn vocabulary and participate in critiques. Students develop complex problems in reflection, three-dimensional illusion, portraiture and imagination, while they explore styles of major artists throughout history.

Drawing III

Intro to Video Production

This course is designed to be an introduction to the art of film and video production. The foremost goal of this course is an increase in the overall literacy and communication skills of the student through a visually driven medium for expression. Students will also become familiar with the parts of the video camera and associated equipment.

Introduction to Art

This course provides a foundation for Upper School visual arts and introduces different approaches to creating art. Emphasis is placed on a heightened awareness of one’s surroundings and careful consideration of the elements and principles of art, which are the basis of carefully planned compositions. Students work with three teachers in the disciplines of drawing, ceramics, sculpture and photography.

Orchestra

Strings in the Upper School is designed for the advanced strings player. Students will explore and perform music of many styles and genres. Students should be able to use vibrato, shift into third position, self-tune, determine proper fingerings and bowings and practice effectively. The music level for this class will be on-par with Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA) grade-levels 4, 5 and 6. Students are encouraged to audition for All-State orchestra and enroll in private lessons. All students enrolled in this course must clear their schedules on the rehearsal and performance dates listed for Upper School Strings in the Strings Handbook.

Painting I

Painting explores color, content and technical skills with water-based media such as water color, gauche and acrylic paint. Students investigate color theory and mix paint to complete their color studies. Participants implement light and shadow, creating representational works. Nontraditional materials are utilized to examine the abstract and experimental realms. Students will visit a gallery exhibit during the semester.

Painting II & III

In this course, students will focus more on content and concepts, along with the exploration of different painting media. Students will work on a variety of projects of varying subject matter. Students will be asked to answer the question, "what is art?" and use that question as motivation to create an identity for themselves throughout the semester. Each student will work toward creating a portfolio for the National Scholastic Art competition in the fall.

Photography I

This course explores both techniques and aesthetics related to art photography. Students explore the creative use of the camera, film processing, analysis of negatives, composition and the making of a fine art print. Interpretation and evaluation through critiques and a brief history of photography are explored.

Photography II & III

Students continue the pursuit of both the technical and aesthetic aspects of art photography. Students have input as to how these subjects are studied by choosing and relating specific aesthetic goals to appropriate photographic techniques. Color in photography is introduced in several ways, as are other experimental techniques.

Sculpture

This is a beginning course in three-dimensional design. Design refers both to problem solving and a well-made end-product. Students' sculptural work will involve the arrangement of various art elements, such as line, plane, surface, mass, material and structure into a cohesive whole. Students will make both additive (an object made of separate parts that have been joined together) and subtractive (where material is removed to reveal a form) sculpture. Students’ work will be expressive, intended to communicate aesthetic, cultural and personal experiences. The structural integrity of the work and the student’s willingness to experiment and explore will be emphasized.

Stagecraft I, II, III & Independent Study

These courses provide hands-on experience in all areas of theater production and maintenance. Students will learn the proper use of shop tools and the basics of theater carpentry. They will build props and scenery, learn about lighting and set painting and delve into other aspects of technical work.

Faculty & Staff

Visual & Performing Arts Department

Mr. Charles Bedell

Mr. Charles Bedell

Fine Arts Center Assistant Technical Director
Mr. Donice Bloodworth

Mr. Donice Bloodworth

US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mr. Sean Bryan

Mr. Sean Bryan

US Visual & Performing Arts Chairperson, US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mr. France Dorman

Mr. France Dorman

US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Dr. Danny Doyle

Dr. Danny Doyle

LS/MS/US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mrs. Tara Harris

Mrs. Tara Harris

MS/US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Ms. Rachael Hunter

Ms. Rachael Hunter

Fine Arts Center Assistant Technical Director
Mr. Mark Knott

Mr. Mark Knott

US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mr. Scott Sargent

Mr. Scott Sargent

Fine Arts Center Technical Director, US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mr. Jack Walker

Mr. Jack Walker

LS/MS/US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mr. Matt Walker

Mr. Matt Walker

Computer Specialist, US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher
Mrs. Susan Wallace

Mrs. Susan Wallace

US Visual & Performing Arts Teacher

Hero Image