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Speakers

Oct. 23
7 p.m.
Pace academy

Never Enough: Tackling Toxic Achievement Culture with Jennie Wallace

The Pace counseling team and the Parenting Connection committee are excited to bring Jennifer Breheny Wallace to Atlanta. In a conversation with Pace consulting psychologist Dr. Christi Bartolomucci, Wallace, award-winning journalist and author of the New York Times bestseller Never Enough: When Achievement Culture Becomes Toxic—And What We Can Do About It, will discuss the pressure on today’s students to succeed in the classroom, on the sports field and in extracurricular pursuits—and the anxiety, depression and self-harm that go with it. How can we teach our kids to strive towards excellence without crushing them? The discussion will take place in the Fine Arts Center's Zalik Theater. Register to attend below.

Jennie Wallace

About Never Enough

Today’s students face unprecedented pressure to succeed. Yet this drive to optimize
performance has only resulted in skyrocketing rates of anxiety, depression, and even
self-harm in America’s highest achieving schools. Parents, educators, and community
leaders are facing the same quandary: how can we teach our kids to strive towards
excellence without crushing them? 

In Never Enough: When Achievement Culture Becomes Toxic—And What We Can Do
About It
, award-winning reporter Jennifer Breheny Wallace investigates the deep roots
of toxic achievement culture, and finds out what we must do to fight back. Drawing on
interviews with researchers, educators, psychologists, and an original survey of nearly
6,000 parents and kids, she exposes how the pressure to perform is not a matter of
parental choice but baked into our larger society. As a result, children are increasingly
absorbing the message that they have no value outside of their accomplishments, a
message that is reinforced by the media and greater culture at large.

Through deep research and interviews with today’s leading child psychologists,
Wallace shows what kids need from the adults in the room is to feel like they matter.
Parents and educators who adopt the language and values of mattering help children have the resilience, self-confidence, and psychological security to thrive.

Packed with memorable stories and offering a powerful toolkit for positive change, Never Enough offers an urgent, humane view of the crisis plaguing today’s teens and a practical framework for how to help.

Register to Attend

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