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Each year, the Pace Fund—Pace Academy’s #1 annual-giving priority—provides vital resources that bolster every aspect of the exceptional Pace education and benefit every student. 

An annual gift to the Pace Fund is the single most important way you can support Pace. Pace Fund resources ensure all facets of the Pace education—from academic and global leadership programming to arts, athletics and extra-curricular offerings—are the highest possible quality. Pace Fund dollars also support faculty professional development, need-based financial aid and other priorities.

Pace alumni are invited to support the Pace Alumni Fund, a branch of the Pace Fund providing direct support to need-based financial aid.

We count on every family to support the Pace Fund—your gift makes a difference! We invite you to make the Pace Fund your #1 Pace giving priority and participate with a gift sized right for your family.

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The Janki Family

From the Winter 2021 Issue of the KnightTimes

TERRI and DAN JANKI became advocates and supporters of Pace Academy in 2008 when they moved from Ridgefield, Conn., to Atlanta and enrolled their daughters, CAROLINE JANKI ’21 and From the KnightTimes Winter 2021 Issue, in Pre-First and second grade. Pace has since felt like home, even with a two-year stretch during which the family—now also including RYAN JANKI ’29—returned to Ridgefield.

Meet Pace Fund Co-Chairs Ciara Irons & Bill Monroe

From the Fall 2022 Issue of the KnightTimes

We invited CIARA IRONS and BILL MONROE, Pace Fund Chairs, to tell us about their families and their role this year as Pace Fund co-chairs.

First Person Pop Up Container

The Janki Family

From the Winter 2021 Issue of the KnightTimes

TERRI and DAN JANKI became advocates and supporters of Pace Academy in 2008 when they moved from Ridgefield, Conn., to Atlanta and enrolled their daughters, CAROLINE JANKI ’21 and MADELINE JANKI ’19, in Pre-First and second grade. Pace has since felt like home, even with a two-year stretch during which the family—now also including RYAN JANKI ’29—returned to Ridgefield.

Before settling in the Peach State, the couple lived in Boston, where they met while participating in GE’s financial management program; Hong Kong, where, as newlyweds, they launched their careers with GE; and then Ridgefield, where their girls were born.

Exploring Atlanta school options, the couple knew from positive experiences in Ridgefield the type of educational setting they were seeking. Terri says, “We wanted a close-knit, family feel with involved parents and strong academics… a place where our girls would thrive and we would meet other parents.”

Terri’s own school days made her particularly intent on finding a school that would offer the children connection and support. Her father’s frequent job transfers brought multiple school changes: “I grew up being the new girl every two to three years,” she explains. “Moving so often, I didn’t have the opportunity to build relationships with my teachers or view them as mentors.” 

Dan, who had attended Catholic schools as a child, says his early views on education were shaped in that “private, very disciplined” setting. These views developed further in college: “My experiences at Ohio State University—an extremely large, public university—provided me with significant contrasts [to K-12].” He names a ‘fend for yourself’ approach as an example; these contrasts underscored for him the benefit of a supportive, independent-school environment.

A culture valuing parent volunteerism was also important, especially to Terri, who had retired from GE Capital in 2006 to be an at-home parent and hoped for opportunities to engage. “Lucky for us, it was an expansion year for the Lower School, and they were willing to meet with us, [even though] we were well past the admissions cycle,” Terri says.

The couple was sold after their visit to Pace. Dan explains, “We knew we had found a school that valued the partnership that exists between faculty, students and parents, and that offered excellent academics.” 

In their 12 years at Pace, the Jankis have strived to uphold their end of the partnership. Terri has volunteered in leadership roles for the Parents Club and the Parents Club Auction; served as a grade representative; and taken on duties such as Lower School office volunteer and Inman Center Snack Bar parent. 

They have also partnered by supporting key fundraising initiatives. “We understand that the Pace Fund supplements the operating budget and helps further the school’s strategic plan— ultimately enhancing the academic experience,” Dan says.

The Jankis signed on to be grade-level leaders during the Aim High capital campaign for the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School, and were early to support Accelerate Pace, Pace’s current capital campaign.

Terri says they are grateful to every division. She appreciates “partnering with the Lower School teachers and learning specialists on what is best for your child to encourage success.” She cites the emphasis on the student-teacher relationship as a valuable aspect of Pace’s Middle and Upper School programs. 

“And of course the Isdell Center for Global Leadership makes Pace unique.” The girls have been to Thailand (Madeline) and South Africa and Lesotho (Caroline) on Habitat for Humanity study tours, and Caroline also ventured on a Care for AIDS trip to Kenya. In fourth grade, Ryan loves “everything [the teachers] do to help you to improve your learning and all the sports and clubs,” with robotics being his favorite. 

As a senior, Caroline is grateful for “the traditions and the teachers, as well as the coaches who help you not only to grow as an athlete, but... to strengthen your character.”

Madeline, a sophomore at the University of Notre Dame, has great affection for Pace. “I know that the Pace community...is always there for me...with guidance, career help or anything in between.” She adds, “Pace was a home for me—I realized that when my family moved away for two years… [I missed] the school pride, connectedness and love that every student and teacher has toward one another.”

Dan’s leadership roles over the course of 30 years at GE inform his thoughts on the Pace education and learning priorities for students. He reflects, “We—parents and teachers—have the same goals for students: to develop the ability to self-advocate; to be confident, engaged and independent learners; and to know when to ask questions or seek help for success in the next chapter.” 

The Jankis’ future hopes for Pace include continued technology investments as well as athletic excellence. Seeing implementation of the Action Plan for Racial Equity is also important to them. Terry says, “We hope this is reflected in admissions as well as hiring—and that the curricula reflect many points of view, helping to instill open-mindedness and build a community that embraces differences.”

Meet Pace Fund Co-Chairs Ciara Irons & Bill Monroe

Tell us about yourself and your family.

CIARA: I am married to my high school sweetheart, EDDIE IRONS, and we have two children, BRICE IRONS ’31 and Rori Irons, 4, currently a student at the Atlanta Speech School. Brice loves gymnastics, skateboarding, horseback riding and all things related to reading. Rori loves tennis and anything in the science and nature realm. As a family, we enjoy exploring new countries and indigenous cultures.  

BILL: My wife, CARTER MONROE, and I are proud Pace parents of our daughter, LAWSON MONROE ’26, and son WILLIAM MONROE ’31. We enjoy staying active—in the fall we can often be found at Pace’s volleyball courts and the Northside Youth Organization’s football fields.

What stands out to you about Pace? 

CIARA: Children are met with an academic rigor that challenges them in an environment that recognizes their individual lights and strengths, and that is small enough for them to feel part of a community. We also have loved the school’s inclusiveness and hands-on approach.

BILL: What first connected us to Pace was the school’s focus on teaching and developing more than just the student in the classroom. Now, after more than 10 years as part of the community, our family has been enriched by all the relationships we’ve developed through Pace.

Why did you choose to co-chair this year’s Pace Fund? 

CIARA: I am intentional about putting my time and energy into my children’s school community, however I am needed. I’ve been involved with the Pace Fund the past few years, and serving as co-chair this year felt organic. It was the right time.

BILL: This is one small way I can give back to the Pace community that has done so much for our family. Asking others for money is rarely comfortable, despite watching [Head of School] FRED ASSAF do it so well—but knowing the Pace Fund supports academic programming, arts, athletics, professional development, financial aid, global leadership and community engagement makes it very rewarding.

Additional thoughts about the Pace Fund?

CIARA: As the school’s #1 annual giving priority, the Pace Fund provides critical resources required by our faculty and staff in educating our children. Participation by 100% of our families, at the level right for them, makes all the difference. I implore every family to be involved! It makes us stronger and empowers our community and children.

BILL: The Pace our families benefit from today exists because of the dedication and support of families before us. Our strong support helps make Pace even better now and for years to come. I hope other families will join us to make this year’s Pace Fund Priority One!

Second Person Pop Up Container

The Janki Family

From the Winter 2021 Issue of the KnightTimes

TERRI and DAN JANKI became advocates and supporters of Pace Academy in 2008 when they moved from Ridgefield, Conn., to Atlanta and enrolled their daughters, CAROLINE JANKI ’21 and MADELINE JANKI ’19, in Pre-First and second grade. Pace has since felt like home, even with a two-year stretch during which the family—now also including RYAN JANKI ’29—returned to Ridgefield.

Before settling in the Peach State, the couple lived in Boston, where they met while participating in GE’s financial management program; Hong Kong, where, as newlyweds, they launched their careers with GE; and then Ridgefield, where their girls were born.

Exploring Atlanta school options, the couple knew from positive experiences in Ridgefield the type of educational setting they were seeking. Terri says, “We wanted a close-knit, family feel with involved parents and strong academics… a place where our girls would thrive and we would meet other parents.”

Terri’s own school days made her particularly intent on finding a school that would offer the children connection and support. Her father’s frequent job transfers brought multiple school changes: “I grew up being the new girl every two to three years,” she explains. “Moving so often, I didn’t have the opportunity to build relationships with my teachers or view them as mentors.” 

Dan, who had attended Catholic schools as a child, says his early views on education were shaped in that “private, very disciplined” setting. These views developed further in college: “My experiences at Ohio State University—an extremely large, public university—provided me with significant contrasts [to K-12].” He names a ‘fend for yourself’ approach as an example; these contrasts underscored for him the benefit of a supportive, independent-school environment.

A culture valuing parent volunteerism was also important, especially to Terri, who had retired from GE Capital in 2006 to be an at-home parent and hoped for opportunities to engage. “Lucky for us, it was an expansion year for the Lower School, and they were willing to meet with us, [even though] we were well past the admissions cycle,” Terri says.

The couple was sold after their visit to Pace. Dan explains, “We knew we had found a school that valued the partnership that exists between faculty, students and parents, and that offered excellent academics.” 

In their 12 years at Pace, the Jankis have strived to uphold their end of the partnership. Terri has volunteered in leadership roles for the Parents Club and the Parents Club Auction; served as a grade representative; and taken on duties such as Lower School office volunteer and Inman Center Snack Bar parent. 

They have also partnered by supporting key fundraising initiatives. “We understand that the Pace Fund supplements the operating budget and helps further the school’s strategic plan— ultimately enhancing the academic experience,” Dan says.

The Jankis signed on to be grade-level leaders during the Aim High capital campaign for the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School, and were early to support Accelerate Pace, Pace’s current capital campaign.

Terri says they are grateful to every division. She appreciates “partnering with the Lower School teachers and learning specialists on what is best for your child to encourage success.” She cites the emphasis on the student-teacher relationship as a valuable aspect of Pace’s Middle and Upper School programs. 

“And of course the Isdell Center for Global Leadership makes Pace unique.” The girls have been to Thailand (Madeline) and South Africa and Lesotho (Caroline) on Habitat for Humanity study tours, and Caroline also ventured on a Care for AIDS trip to Kenya. In fourth grade, Ryan loves “everything [the teachers] do to help you to improve your learning and all the sports and clubs,” with robotics being his favorite. 

As a senior, Caroline is grateful for “the traditions and the teachers, as well as the coaches who help you not only to grow as an athlete, but... to strengthen your character.”

Madeline, a sophomore at the University of Notre Dame, has great affection for Pace. “I know that the Pace community...is always there for me...with guidance, career help or anything in between.” She adds, “Pace was a home for me—I realized that when my family moved away for two years… [I missed] the school pride, connectedness and love that every student and teacher has toward one another.”

Dan’s leadership roles over the course of 30 years at GE inform his thoughts on the Pace education and learning priorities for students. He reflects, “We—parents and teachers—have the same goals for students: to develop the ability to self-advocate; to be confident, engaged and independent learners; and to know when to ask questions or seek help for success in the next chapter.” 

The Jankis’ future hopes for Pace include continued technology investments as well as athletic excellence. Seeing implementation of the Action Plan for Racial Equity is also important to them. Terry says, “We hope this is reflected in admissions as well as hiring—and that the curricula reflect many points of view, helping to instill open-mindedness and build a community that embraces differences.”

Meet Pace Fund Co-Chairs Ciara Irons & Bill Monroe

Tell us about yourself and your family.

CIARA: I am married to my high school sweetheart, EDDIE IRONS, and we have two children, BRICE IRONS ’31 and Rori Irons, 4, currently a student at the Atlanta Speech School. Brice loves gymnastics, skateboarding, horseback riding and all things related to reading. Rori loves tennis and anything in the science and nature realm. As a family, we enjoy exploring new countries and indigenous cultures.  

BILL: My wife, CARTER MONROE, and I are proud Pace parents of our daughter, LAWSON MONROE ’26, and son WILLIAM MONROE ’31. We enjoy staying active—in the fall we can often be found at Pace’s volleyball courts and the Northside Youth Organization’s football fields.

What stands out to you about Pace? 

CIARA: Children are met with an academic rigor that challenges them in an environment that recognizes their individual lights and strengths, and that is small enough for them to feel part of a community. We also have loved the school’s inclusiveness and hands-on approach.

BILL: What first connected us to Pace was the school’s focus on teaching and developing more than just the student in the classroom. Now, after more than 10 years as part of the community, our family has been enriched by all the relationships we’ve developed through Pace.

Why did you choose to co-chair this year’s Pace Fund? 

CIARA: I am intentional about putting my time and energy into my children’s school community, however I am needed. I’ve been involved with the Pace Fund the past few years, and serving as co-chair this year felt organic. It was the right time.

BILL: This is one small way I can give back to the Pace community that has done so much for our family. Asking others for money is rarely comfortable, despite watching [Head of School] FRED ASSAF do it so well—but knowing the Pace Fund supports academic programming, arts, athletics, professional development, financial aid, global leadership and community engagement makes it very rewarding.

Additional thoughts about the Pace Fund?

CIARA: As the school’s #1 annual giving priority, the Pace Fund provides critical resources required by our faculty and staff in educating our children. Participation by 100% of our families, at the level right for them, makes all the difference. I implore every family to be involved! It makes us stronger and empowers our community and children.

BILL: The Pace our families benefit from today exists because of the dedication and support of families before us. Our strong support helps make Pace even better now and for years to come. I hope other families will join us to make this year’s Pace Fund Priority One!

Ways to Give

There are many ways to give to the Pace Fund. In fact, you choose how to make your gift:

Annual Report

 

 

Thanks to the Pace Fund Volunteer Committee

for contributing time and talent to this vital annual initiative

Parent Leadership
Ciara Irons, Pace Fund Chair
Bill Monroe, Pace Fund Chair

New Family and Inclusion Leadership
Hanan Idris
Samir Idris
Whitney Paulowsky
Ryan Paulowsky

Alumni Parent Committee
Bryan Chitwood '93
Meredith Forrester '95

New Parent and Inclusion Committee and Pre-First
Eric Brune
Prashanth Chintanapalli
David Neckman
Julia Neckman
Kavitha Reddy

First
David Gold
Gregory Mitchell
Katherine Mitchell

Second
Jay Caifa
Meredith Caifa
Heather Friedman
Michelle Edwards

Third
Alisa Alloy
Jason Alloy '95
David Stern

Fourth
Michelle Edwards

Fifth
Eddie Irons
Bill Monroe

Sixth
Crystal Shah
Jennifer Bodner

Seventh
Amanda Parrilli
Grace Gavric
Tom Buehler

Eighth
Anand Dutta
Kara Dutta
Rod Drews '00

Ninth
Mike Locker
Jim Roth
Keri Roth

Tenth
Ellie Weiss
Josh Weiss
Wendy Siskin

Eleventh
Justin Berman
Pete Davis
Alli Richardson
Matt Richardson

Twelfth
Tad Little
Jennifer Hayes

Gift Acceptance Policy

Pace Academy welcomes philanthropic gifts from Donor Advised Funds (DAFs). In order to accept a gift or grant from a DAF, the following must apply: No donor or individual related to the donor will receive any goods, services or other more than incidental private benefits.  Examples may include but are not limited to: If the grant is for an event or gala, it does not pay for tickets or any goods purchased at auction.  If the grant is for a membership, the membership must be considered 100% tax deductible.  The payment may not be a bifurcated payment; meaning the donor-advised fund has provided the deductible portion and the donor intends to provide the non-deductible portion separately.  Any payment received that does not adhere to these guidelines will not be deposited, and the payment will be returned to the DAF.

At Pace Academy, gifts intended to pay for sponsorships or memberships with benefits from DAFs will not be accepted for the following events and programs: Pace Fall Fair, Knight Out With Keeping Pace, Alumni Knight Cap, Parents Club Auction, Pace Race, Queens of the Court, Arts Alliance memberships, Booster Club memberships.  Donors can make a gift from a DAF for the full amount of the sponsorship and forgo all benefits.    

Examples of where gifts from DAFs are encouraged: The Pace Fund, Accelerate Pace (capital campaigns), Tax Credit payments to Apogee Fund, endowment gifts, planned giving and other 100% tax-deductible special philanthropic initiatives.